Fair Trade Kenyan Green Beans – net good thing?

4 thoughts on “Fair Trade Kenyan Green Beans – net good thing?”

  1. It’s fab. Thank you so much. And interesting point about the apples – thought I was doing so well avoiding NZ / South African apples, I honestly thought the UK ones were just sitting in a barn somewhere.
    Oops, still good intentions! xxx

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  2. Glad you found it useful Mavis. Re apples, I was also surprised (though American novels about the pioneers always describe stored apples as wrinkled, so I guess I should have known!), don’t forget the UK apple season runs from September to May, so do buy British then.

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    1. Sorry I didn’t get back to you Sam, I wasn’t working on this site for a while. You asked two great questions:
      Approximately, how much green beans are imported from Kenya. To answer this I turned to gov.uk, it has lots of statistics although it can be a bit frustrating finding good data.
      According to Defra, in 2013 the UK imported £449 million of fresh and chilled vegetables. (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/overseas-trade-in-food-feed-and-drink). It does not break this data down further, but major food groups are counted separately, so I think this is the kind of veg we get from Africa. Now while we are a big customer to Kenya, it is not a major exporter to us. So only a tiny chunk of that money will be Kenyan Green Beans, however, the same principles apply to all this food.

      You also ask if I can list the advantages and disadvantages to buying green beans from Kenya.

      Advantages to the UK
      Out of seasonal food
      Cheaper food

      Disadvantages to the UK
      Carbon emissions and air borne pollutants such Nox

      Advantages to Kenya
      Income (in a hard currency)

      Disadvantages to Kenya
      While the Kenyans grow food for us, they are not growing food for themselves

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